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By Tanaka Cyril Mashiche
Mar 1st, 2019

To take care of our bodies, we eat well, exercise and make sure to get enough sleep. That’s our internal environment. The environment that surrounds us — the air, soil, water and ecosystems — is equally important for our health and the health and well-being of others.

As we read the book of Genesis this week about creation we hear that God created everything and it was good. Human beings were given dominion over creation meaning taking care of the environment not exploiting nature. One may ask what practical steps we are taking here at the school to be more in communion with our environment.

Unlike any other time in history, due to its own actions, humanity is confronted with the real possibility of destroying its natural environment and thus ending its own existence: pollution, the exploitation of natural resources and the destruction of ecosystems that generates consequences in the social fabric.

We have rightly emphasized social justice in our education in the last decades; we still need to do more to be able to respond to the challenges coming from a true education for social justice. However, we need to do this within the context of our new ecological crisis.

What commitments should we adopt as a global network in order to be collaborative members in the effort to cure our wounded societies and world?

What type of men and women should we form so that they praise the creation and so ensure the survival of social justice and ecological peace within our communities and the world?

When we throw papers away, burn waste in front of the dinning is it the best way disposing paper?

It is upon us as students, teachers, administrators and the religious to come up with a clean Visitation.